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Suggest hairstyle for an 18 year old with traction alopecia getting his first haircut
05-08-2015, 09:44 PM (This post was last modified: 05-08-2015 09:45 PM by Jarmuh.)
Post: #1
Suggest hairstyle for an 18 year old with traction alopecia getting his first haircut
I was raised in a Sikh household and have been pretty much forced to keep my hair uncut as well as tyed under a turban. Due to continued pressure, my hair has begun thinning out from the front the past year. It looks rats, so I would really appreciate it if anyone could suggest a haircut or style that can cover it up.

[Image: FMqngnF.jpg]

How it currently looks, rats gets me depressed, especially cause I'm only 18.
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05-09-2015, 07:16 PM
Post: #2
RE: Suggest hairstyle for an 18 year old with traction alopecia getting his first haircut
Bump...Really need this help
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05-10-2015, 11:57 AM
Post: #3
How to treat traction alopecia: start by getting a short haircut and good nutrition.
Welcome to the forum, even though I can understand your not-so-ideal situation for coming here.

Indeed, that which you have is traction alopecia. The hairstyle that you have right there (i.e. a pineapple hairstyle, similar to a man bun hairstyle) is good for traction alopecia. Essentially, you want to avoid as much weight and tension on your hair follicles as possible. Traction alopecia not only rips apart the hair strands from the follicles but also whatever hair strands remain attached to the follicle are weakened and the production of further hair-strand material is also weakened, which aggravates the traction alopecia even further.

What the above means is that you must avoid any tension whatsoever on your hair. This means that you should not wear your long hair down (for now) since your hair looks to be quite long and thus heavy. Likewise, exercise extreme care when styling your hair, even if it's only in that pineapple hairstyle. I can see that you've released tension from the bun, which you must always do. Never leave your hair tied with too much tension on it, as the tension itself pulls on the attached structure from the follicle.

Now, you mention a haircut. Are you getting your hair completely cut? Or are you just getting a simple trim but will remain with long hair? Let us know the answers to those questions as it looks unclear what you're wanting to do.

Another question, how long is your hair? From my understanding, you leave your hair to grow from a young age without any trimming whatsoever, so the hair gets really long and thus heavy. I can absolutely understand your worries, but the good thing is that, with your age, you have a better outcome of recovery than someone who is older.

There doesn't seem to be any scarring on the parts with traction alopecia, so that's a good thing too. Likewise, I don't see any hints of male pattern alopecia, which is another good thing. The best course for action would be for you to get a short haircut and let your hair recover with good supplementation. By cutting your long hair, you will remove a lot of weight from your follicles, so that would ideally be the situation. However, I don't know if this is what you're looking for or if you can in fact cut your hair short.

By short, I'm talking of a maximum of 4 inches long, nothing longer than that. In fact, I would suggest that you get any type of buzz cut so that we eliminate any chances of you pulling your hair. You may also try a Caesar haircut by which you leave your hair at a length of 2 inches and then you comb the hair forward to leave a short fringe, which would putatively cover your hair loss area until it grows again.

As for supplementation, you want to get on the hair-friendly nutrients as soon as possible. You want to start taking omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil or cod liver oil), vitamin A, vitamin C and vitamin E. As for minerals, you should be getting enough zinc (with copper) and selenium.

If you're vegetarian or if you aren't getting enough protein, you can always get some extra protein into your diet via the use of a simple whey protein supplement. One scoop per day in the morning should provide you an extra boost in protein intake that could benefit your traction alopecia recovery. Protein is extremely important for hair growth and hair quality, so taking a little bit more than usual can help in this phase.

Have a serious look at our hair nutrients discussion where we go through all the vitamins, minerals and nutrients needed for optimal hair growth and optimal hair quality. While the discussed nutrients can be achieved via one's diet, you'd have to have an extremely well-prepared diet that is just not possible if you live a hectic life. Hence, supplements come in to help you achieve optimal levels of nutrients. Having said this, nutrients are just helpers for your hair-growth recovery, it's up to your body to start the mechanism to heal the follicles and get them producing high-quality hair strands.

We can talk more about hair nutrients once we get your replies to my questions above. One supplement that you may benefit from is minoxidil which is the active ingredient in the hair loss supplement known as Rogaine. This product is used to treat male pattern baldness, and it's method of action is believed to be through better nutrient delivery to the follicles, something which theoretically would also help in traction alopecia.

Anyway, as I've mentioned earlier, you have the odds in your favor, so don't stress too much about it. Namely, you have your age in your favor, and at your age your skin heals pretty well. One indication of that is that you've no visible scarring on the affected areas, so you have a good chance of regrowing your lost hair! Smile

I'm one of the admins of this forum. Any questions/issue? Contact me directly or any of the moderators. We welcome any feedback to improve our community.

You can also check out our forum's BEST HAIR PRODUCTS FOR MEN thread to read opinions and useful information on men's hair products.
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05-14-2015, 08:26 PM
Post: #4
RE: Suggest hairstyle for an 18 year old with traction alopecia getting his first haircut
(05-10-2015 11:57 AM)TheMensHairForum Wrote:  Welcome to the forum, even though I can understand your not-so-ideal situation for coming here.

Indeed, that which you have is traction alopecia. The hairstyle that you have right there (i.e. a pineapple hairstyle, similar to a is good for traction alopecia. Essentially, you want to avoid as much weight and tension on your hair follicles as possible. Traction alopecia not only rips apart the hair strands from the follicles but also whatever hair strands remain attached to the follicle are weakened and the production of further hair-strand material is also weakened, which aggravates the traction alopecia even further.

What the above means is that you must avoid any tension whatsoever on your hair. This means that you should not wear your long hair down (for now) since your hair looks to be quite long and thus heavy. Likewise, exercise extreme care when styling your hair, even if it's only in that pineapple hairstyle. I can see that you've released tension from the bun, which you must always do. Never leave your hair tied with too much tension on it, as the tension itself pulls on the attached structure from the follicle.

Now, you mention a haircut. Are you getting your hair completely cut? Or are you just getting a simple trim but will remain with long hair? Let us know the answers to those questions as it looks unclear what you're wanting to do.

Another question, how long is your hair? From my understanding, you leave your hair to grow from a young age without any trimming whatsoever, so the hair gets really long and thus heavy. I can absolutely understand your worries, but the good thing is that, with your age, you have a better outcome of recovery than someone who is older.

There doesn't seem to be any scarring on the parts with traction alopecia, so that's a good thing too. Likewise, I don't see any hints of male pattern alopecia, which is another good thing. The best course for action would be for you to get a short haircut and let your hair recover with good supplementation. By cutting your long hair, you will remove a lot of weight from your follicles, so that would ideally be the situation. However, I don't know if this is what you're looking for or if you can in fact cut your hair short.

By short, I'm talking of a maximum of 4 inches long, nothing longer than that. In fact, I would suggest that you get any so that we eliminate any chances of you pulling your hair. You may also try a Caesar haircut by which you leave your hair at a length of 2 inches and then you comb the hair forward to leave a short fringe, which would putatively cover your hair loss area until it grows again.

As for supplementation, you want to get on the hair-friendly nutrients as soon as possible. You want to start taking omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil or cod liver oil), vitamin A, vitamin C and vitamin E. As for minerals, you should be getting enough zinc (with copper) and selenium.

If you're vegetarian or if you aren't getting enough protein, you can always get some extra protein into your diet via the use of a simple whey protein supplement. One scoop per day in the morning should provide you an extra boost in protein intake that could benefit your traction alopecia recovery. Protein is extremely important for hair growth and hair quality, so taking a little bit more than usual can help in this phase.

Have a serious look at our hair nutrients discussion where we go through all the vitamins, minerals and nutrients needed for optimal hair growth and optimal hair quality. While the discussed nutrients can be achieved via one's diet, you'd have to have an extremely well-prepared diet that is just not possible if you live a hectic life. Hence, supplements come in to help you achieve optimal levels of nutrients. Having said this, nutrients are just helpers for your hair-growth recovery, it's up to your body to start the mechanism to heal the follicles and get them producing high-quality hair strands.

We can talk more about hair nutrients once we get your replies to my questions above. One supplement that you may benefit from is minoxidil which is the active ingredient in the hair loss supplement known as Rogaine. This product is used to treat male pattern baldness, and it's method of action is believed to be through better nutrient delivery to the follicles, something which theoretically would also help in traction alopecia.

Anyway, as I've mentioned earlier, you have the odds in your favor, so don't stress too much about it. Namely, you have your age in your favor, and at your age your skin heals pretty well. One indication of that is that you've no visible scarring on the affected areas, so you have a good chance of regrowing your lost hair! Smile

Thanks for all the awesome advice, and sorry for the late reply. To answer your questions, my hair is very long, almost down to my hips, and it has been tied in a bun under a turban for a while, though the alopecia really started appearing only 1-1.5 years ago. Also, I do plan on getting it fully cut so I have a completely new hairstyle. As for nutrition, I think I'm fine in that aspect as I eat plenty of protein as I track my macronutrients since I go to the gym, and I'm starting to take a biotin pill every night. After much research, I've decided to keep my hair fairly long (4-5 inches) though with a fringe to cover the scalp, and if the alopecia at the temples still show I'll try to get a fade. What do you have to say about this? In addition, I was told I should go to a salon rather than a barber for such a cut, do you agree?
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05-15-2015, 08:02 AM
Post: #5
A fringe haircut like a Caesar haircut will work very well for traction alopecia.
Yes, I think such a haircut to cover the traction alopecia with a fringe until it regrows is a good idea. Having said that, the haircut will need to be staggered so as to make the fringe look natural, which means that the haircut will involve more of a modern approach to cutting it. A hair salon (instead of a barbershop) should be able to handle better such a haircut when doing it from such long hair as yours.

Have a look in the following link at the Caesar haircut which involves such a fringe although shorter. In any case, a longer Caesar haircut would also do you very well as the hair styling of a Caesar haircut is forward, hence the fringe feels very natural. We will be publishing a Caesar haircut guide in the next couple of days so stay tuned for that one. However, trust your hairdresser in him/her getting the fringe right as hairdressers are very well acquainted with fringe haircuts and modern haircut techniques.

Simply put, the hairdressers and stylists at salons are used to chopping very long hair whereas barbers are used to rimming and cutting short to medium length hair, so, in this instance, I do agree that it's best to go to a hair salon for the big chop and fringe haircut.

So as to maximize the recovery process, make sure you're taking enough omega-3 fatty acids (e.g. from cod liver oil or fish oil), vitamin A, vitamin C and zinc. All these nutrients are involved with wound healing and skin healing, so you will get make the best recovery by ensuring that you are satisfying your needs for these nutrients. If in doubt, go through our hair nutrients discussion as I posted earlier for a good idea on which are the best nutrients for male hair. Make sure that you're getting in those nutrients through your diet or use of supplements.

Also, if you're a smoker, smoking itself impairs the healing process so be careful with that. Just letting you know of the variables involved in healing damage to hair follicles as, with such a young age as yours, I'd like for you to make the best recovery and gain back your hairline as soon as possible, which you will do! Smile

Keep us updated on how the haircut went and how your hairline recovers.

I'm one of the admins of this forum. Any questions/issue? Contact me directly or any of the moderators. We welcome any feedback to improve our community.

You can also check out our forum's BEST HAIR PRODUCTS FOR MEN thread to read opinions and useful information on men's hair products.
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Quote this message in a reply
05-15-2015, 04:26 PM (This post was last modified: 05-15-2015 04:27 PM by Jarmuh.)
Post: #6
RE: Suggest hairstyle for an 18 year old with traction alopecia getting his first haircut
(05-15-2015 08:02 AM)TheMensHairForum Wrote:  Yes, I think such a haircut to cover the traction alopecia with a fringe until it regrows is a good idea. Having said that, the haircut will need to be staggered so as to make the fringe look natural, which means that the haircut will involve more of a modern approach to cutting it. A hair salon (instead of a barbershop) should be able to handle better such a haircut when doing it from such long hair as yours.

Have a look in the following link at the Caesar haircut which involves such a fringe although shorter. In any case, a longer Caesar haircut would also do you very well as the hair styling of a Caesar haircut is forward, hence the fringe feels very natural. We will be publishing a Caesar haircut guide in the next couple of days so stay tuned for that one. However, trust your hairdresser in him/her getting the fringe right as hairdressers are very well acquainted with fringe haircuts and modern haircut techniques.

Simply put, the hairdressers and stylists at salons are used to chopping very long hair whereas barbers are used to rimming and cutting short to medium length hair, so, in this instance, I do agree that it's best to go to a hair salon for the big chop and fringe haircut.

So as to maximize the recovery process, make sure you're taking enough omega-3 fatty acids (e.g. from cod liver oil or fish oil), vitamin A, vitamin C and zinc. All these nutrients are involved with wound healing and skin healing, so you will get make the best recovery by ensuring that you are satisfying your needs for these nutrients. If in doubt, go through our hair nutrients discussion as I posted earlier for a good idea on which are the best nutrients for male hair. Make sure that you're getting in those nutrients through your diet or use of supplements.

Also, if you're a smoker, smoking itself impairs the healing process so be careful with that. Just letting you know of the variables involved in healing damage to hair follicles as, with such a young age as yours, I'd like for you to make the best recovery and gain back your hairline as soon as possible, which you will do! :)

Keep us updated on how the haircut went and how your hairline recovers.

Thanks again, and one last question especially the one regarding smoking: can occasional marijuana smoking (1-2 times a week) have a significant effect on the healing process? Also I will make sure to document on this forum the haircut and my recovery thereafter :)
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